Working Out For Your Life

By June 4, 2019 June 20th, 2019 Uncategorized
WORKING OUT FOR LIFE

By Zach Columbia BS. NASM. FPT.

We all know working out is good for our health… It’s why we do it. Obviously, there are a lot of benefits that come from being healthy, like increased energy levels, a stronger immune system and a more attractive appearance just to name a few. We always ask prospective members why they want to achieve their goals. The most common response is “For my health.” What does that really mean? I’m here to put it into perspective for you.

About a year ago, I was playing baseball and felt a pain in my throwing arm. It seemed like no big deal, but over the course of the next several weeks and months, my arm continued to swell, increasing to an outrageous size. I asked consulted with several doctors and there was no real consensus. So, I continued my normal activities with one normal arm and one giant arm, until one night during a baseball game, there was a little scuffle. No big deal, just boys, being boys, but the boost in adrenaline, seemed to “cure” whatever was wrong with my arm and all of the swelling suddenly went away. I was elated, until several hours passed and I ended up in the emergency room with horrible chest pain and shortness of breath.

After numerous tests, the doctor came in, told me nothing was wrong with me and sent me home. My chest pain and shortness of breath continued for 48 hours or so. After it subsided my arm ballooned back up. A month later, I was laying in a hospital bed, waiting to go into surgery to clear out numerous clots running from my neck to my elbow. Turns out my little scuffle a month prior had jolted a clot loose. The emergency staff had missed the pulmonary embolism I was having during my previous visit. Nearly a year and seven surgeries later, I’m glad to still be above ground.

You see, people tell me all the time, they want to be healthy.

They want the benefits of working out. To have more energy, to feel stronger, and to look better. What they don’t realize is they’re not just working out for their health, but they’re working out for their life!

Take my story as an example.

Had I not been in such good physical condition, there is very little chance that I would be sitting here writing this article. Deep Vein Thrombosis kills 60-100k people in the U.S. each year and 25% of those die suddenly at the first sign of the condition. The mortality rate is extremely high for those that don’t receive treatment.

I have personally worked with several members here at Pulse personal training studio with similar stories, who after traumatic health complications were told by their doctors that they would not still be around had they not been on a regular workout program.

Health is so easy to take for granted. It’s not something we typically think about unless we are experiencing a disruption in it. The problem is, often that disruption is instantly or even worse, painfully and slowly fatal. If you take your health for granted, it is highly likely that by the time you realize there’s a problem, the damage is irreversible.

According to numerous scientific studies it has been concluded that “exercise-induced health benefits are in part related to favorable modulations of cardiovascular risk factors observed by increased physical activity or structured exercise programs.” (Kokkinos, 2012).

If your someone who hasn’t given much thought to their health in the past, perhaps you should consider how fragile life truly is. One of the easiest ways to start improving your health is through a workout program. If on the other hand, you are someone like me who’s both personal and professional life has revolved around being healthy, good for you. You’re a step ahead of the game, but don’t just go through the motions. Do better until you know better, then do better.

Allow me to leave you with one of my favorite quotes, one that is probably more true in my own life than any other, “Training To Get STRONG Isn’t DangerousBeing WEAK Is Dangerous!”

 

References:

Kokkinos, Peter 2012. Web: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3501820/

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